Venturing to the West Coast

Last weekend I took my second ever plane to Seattle to visit one of my wonderful friends. She and I lived together in college and the second I hopped into her car, it was like we were gallivanting around Bloomington again. Nothing between us has changed, and for that I am grateful.

We explored Pike Place, wandered around the beautiful city and shamefully drank 7-Eleven gas station coffee (but later redeemed ourselves with awesome and unusual coffee from actual Seattle favorites – I got a cardamom latte from Victrola Coffee and I imagine that’s what heaven’s coffee might taste like). We visited the Fremont Troll and ate enough late-night Velveeta (our college favorite) to last us a lifetime. I can’t even begin to express how refreshing it was to get out of town and to see her lovely face. And to do our relentless, loud Arnold Schwarzenegger impressions together again.

But this trip had me thinking more about what I want out of my life, and I realized that nesting in Indiana forever is not my calling. While I love the Midwest (I find it charming and welcoming, and I can’t lie – I love these chilly, bare-tree November days), I can’t imagine myself living here every single day for the rest of my life.

My fiance and I still need to get our affairs settled (you know, the whole “I’ll change my name and we’ll both get rings and then let’s party” deal) and determine where we really want to go, why, and how we’re going to get there. But someday I want to wander around this country and see everything I’ve missed these past 23 years. I want to go west of the Mississippi again (last weekend was my very first time crossing that great river).

So decreasing my need for material things has a new perk: I don’t have to be tied down. I don’t want to be tied down to matching dish sets and fine china, or tied down to nice furniture and expensive, massive electronics. I don’t even want to be tied down to books or to extra pillows. I love my rabbits more than anything, but even they tie me down a bit (but that is a commitment I can live with).

So for you all either living a simple lifestyle or considering one, where would you go if you weren’t tied down? Would you leave this country or explore more of your neighboring states?

 

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8 thoughts on “Venturing to the West Coast

  1. Over the last 10 years I’ve moved around a ton (living in 5 states and 2 countries, and visiting many more). While I’m simplifying and settling where I am now (Nashville), not being bound to huge amounts of stuff is so freeing. It gives me many more options as far as what I can do and when. Not to mention it makes moving a lot easier πŸ™‚

    • Thanks for sharing Amanda! That’s so inspiring. I lived in 4 different places last year and moving was worse each time. That was one of the main reasons I started this blog and this journey – it was just too hard! Not to mention, some of the stuff never even made it out of boxes before I decided/had to move again.

    • That sounds wonderful! I agree, I have a dear friend living over in Germany who only took a suitcase worth of stuff to live with her husband in a tiny studio apartment for 6 months. I’m so encouraged and fascinated by that! Good luck on keeping things minimal and all your future moves!

  2. I have lived up and down the west coast in both Canada and the USA and have been settled in Portland Oregon for about 7 years now. But I wish to move closer to the ocean again. No matter where one lives, they wish for something that is lacking in the current location πŸ™‚ I would never wish to live in LA again though!!! We are tied down here for now as our youngest goes through school and waiting for the real estate market to go up so we don’t owe the bank when we sell this house!

    • That sounds like quite the adventure! My fiance actually wants to move to LA, so I’m a bit nervous/very excited about the idea of living there (I don’t know if it will be my cup of tea or not!) It does sound nice to be settled for a while, and I’ve heard so many great things about Portland πŸ™‚

  3. I’ve done a lot of international traveling (SE Asia, Europe) over the years during my youth (with my parents) and I also temporarily lived overseas whilst I was at university in the UK. To be honest, now that I have a stable job and am getting my life in order financially, I’m not that inclined to have a nomadic life, though the notion is romantic. Although I have a “home base” in the Seattle area I don’t feel that this has restricted me from travel. In the past 6 years, I’ve visited Japan a couple of times as well as went back to the UK for a visit. I’ve also visited several different states in the US. Domestic travel is something that I never really did much of when I was growing up, since much of our travel was international. I’m lucky that my job has provided me with a few travel opportunities as well. So I’m already exploring around, though I don’t deny that it would be nice to have a bit more time to do even more travel. I would really like to visit a few places that I’ve never been–like Turkey, the UAE, China, New Zealand, and Australia, as well as return to places I’ve already seen in Europe (mostly places in the Schengen Area), but next time with my wife, who didn’t travel much internationally when she was growing up. I feel privileged and lucky that I’ve already done a lot of traveling, and most of my traveling was done before I had a stable career.

    • That all sounds fantastic! I do wish I could have traveled more before, during and after college but I have a feeling that my adventures are just beginning πŸ™‚ Thanks for reading!

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